Principal’s Message Week 5

Dear Parents and Carers

NAPLAN

NAPLAN has been and gone, and for our students it came and went smoothly.

Walk to School Day and Healthy Breakfast
Just a reminder that Kapinara’s Walk to School Day is on Friday (31 May 2019). National Walk Safely to School Day is now in its 20th year, and is intended to provide an opportunity for primary schools and parents to promote

  • safe pedestrian behaviours;
  • the importance of physical activity (particularly regular walking to and from school); and
  •  the importance of reducing our environmental footprint

Thanks to our wonderful P & C, it is also an opportunity to remind everyone of the importance of a healthy breakfast. Thank you to those who have volunteered to walk some students from one of three neighbourhood locations, and those who have volunteered to create and serve a healthy breakfast for our Kapinara students. We strongly encourage as many as possible to participate!

Reading Books

We have ‘lost’ far too many reading books. If you have any ‘errant’ reading books at home, please send them in urgently. There will be a box in the front office where these can be dropped off.

Earn and Learn

Woolworth’s Earn and Learn promotion is on again, so please encourage friends, neighbours and family who shop at Woolworths or don’t necessarily have a ‘favourite’ supermarket, to collect these on our behalf. The stickers earn points, which schools can exchange for a range of educational resources.

Health and Wellbeing

While the importance of regular school attendance cannot be overstated, the exception to this is an unwell child. We all have a role to play in minimising, if not preventing, the spread of illness within our school community. The last two to three weeks have been particularly bad, particularly early, in terms of illness sweeping communities, including ours. We have now had several families confirm that they have, or have had, Influenza A and we have had unusually high numbers of children who have been unwell. We will be stepping up the use of soap and sanitising gel in classes and at break times, and stressing the need to ‘cover’ a cough or sneeze.

We appreciate that it is often difficult to determine ‘how unwell’ a child is and therefore whether to send him or her to school. If children have a fever, have vomited or have had an upset stomach that morning or the previous night, they should not be at school. Advice through the Department of Health provides the following information for families:

  • children should stay at home if they are likely to be infectious and shed the virus or bacteria through coughing, sneezing, contaminating surfaces and personal contact
  • children who are ill should not to return to school while unwell; they should be symptom free if they have a cold or ?u; and remain home for at least 24 hours if they have had gastroenteritis
  • parents are encouraged to seek medical advice if their child has ongoing symptoms of illness.

Thanks to the significant numbers of families who have kept their unwell child at home.

National Reconciliation Week

As you may be aware, this is National Reconciliation Week. This year’s theme is Grounded in truth: walk together with courage. Today I have been incredibly impressed with examples of student’s writing on reconciliation and this year’s theme, and I hope to seek permission from some students to place several reflections on our website, so these can be shared more widely. Students learning about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, language and culture is a priority for our Department and is a focus in our own developing Business Plan. I look forward to sharing more about this in future newsletters.

Best wishes

Elizabeth Blackwell